Why wires are twisted?

Twisted pair is the ordinary copper wire that connects home and many business computers to the telephone company. To reduce crosstalk or electromagnetic induction between pairs of wires, two insulated copper wires are twisted around each other. Ordinary wire to the home is unshielded twisted pair (UTP).
A.

What is the purpose of twisting wires?

Twisted pair cabling is a type of wiring in which two conductors of a single circuit are twisted together for the purposes of canceling out electromagnetic interference (EMI) from external sources; for instance, electromagnetic radiation from unshielded twisted pair (UTP) cables, and crosstalk between neighboring pairs
  • When did Cat 5 come out?

    The Cat5e standard was first released in 1999 as part of the Telecommunications Industry Association's TIA/EIA-568-5-A document specification.
  • How Fast Is Cat 5?

    Cat5e: Faster with Less Interference. Category 5 enhanced cabling, also known as Cat5e, is an improvement on Cat5 cabling. It was made to support 1000 Mbps "gigabit" speeds, so in theory, it's faster than Cat5. It it also cuts down on crosstalk, the interference you can sometimes get between wires inside the cable.
  • Are LAN and Ethernet cables the same thing?

    An ethernet cable is required to connect your device to a LocalAreaNetwork(LAN). Both are same. LAN cable includes any cable that can be used to run a short distance, including Coax cables or Ethernet cables (often CAT5e,CAT6 wiring) .
B.

What is the purpose of twisted pair cable?

The use of two wires twisted together helps to reduce crosstalk and electromagnetic induction. While twisted-pair cable is used by older telephone networks and is the least expensive type of local-area network (LAN) cable, most networks contain some twisted-pair cabling at some point along the network.
  • What is the purpose of twisted pair cable?

    Twisted pair cabling is a type of wiring in which two conductors of a single circuit are twisted together for the purposes of canceling out electromagnetic interference (EMI) from external sources; for instance, electromagnetic radiation from shielded twisted pair (UTP) cables, and cross talk between neighboring pairs.
  • What is twisted pair cables used for?

    Twisted-pair cable. A Shielded Twisted Pair (STP) has a fine wire mesh surrounding the wires to protect the transmission; an Unshielded Twisted Pair (UTP) do not. Shielded cable is used in older telephone networks, as well as network and data communications to reduce outside interference.
  • What are the different types of twisted pair cable?

    The following sections discuss the types of cables used in networks and other related topics.
    • Unshielded Twisted Pair (UTP) Cable.
    • Shielded Twisted Pair (STP) Cable.
    • Coaxial Cable.
    • Fiber Optic Cable.
    • Cable Installation Guides.
    • Wireless LANs.
    • Unshielded Twisted Pair (UTP) Cable.
C.

What power lines are made of?

The bare wire conductors on the line are generally made of aluminum (either plain or reinforced with steel, or composite materials such as carbon and glass fiber), though some copper wires are used in medium-voltage distribution and low-voltage connections to customer premises.
  • How high off the ground are power lines?

    There's a specific rule for power lines and conductors where the voltage does not exceed 150 volts to ground. The required minimum clearance is 10 feet above finished grade or sidewalks, or from any platform or projection from which the lines might be reached (and are accessible to pedestrians only).
  • Why are bats electrocuted on power lines?

    It comes down to electrocuted bats remain on the wire, while electrocuted birds fall off the wire, due to the difference in the way their feet grip. And regardless… two wires must be touched simultaneously by either animal in order for electrocution to happen. Neither gets shocked by touching a single wire.
  • Why do we need to transmit electricity at high voltages?

    When a current flows through a wire some energy is lost as heat. The higher the current, the more heat is lost. To reduce these losses, the National Grid transmits electricity at a low current. This needs a high voltage.

Updated: 2nd October 2019

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