Which body systems are affected by type 2 diabetes?

Type 2 diabetes can be easy to ignore, especially in the early stages when you're feeling fine. But diabetes affects many major organs, including your heart, blood vessels, nerves, eyes and kidneys. Controlling your blood sugar levels can help prevent these complications.
A.

What body system is diabetes associated with?

The pancreas, while not an endocrine gland, is part of the body's hormone secreting system. It is responsible for producing insulin and glucagons, both of which help maintain sugar levels in the blood stream and help give the body energy.
  • How does diabetes affect your heart?

    Over time, high blood glucose from diabetes can damage your blood vessels and the nerves that control your heart and blood vessels. The longer you have diabetes, the higher the chances that you will develop heart disease. In adults with diabetes, the most common causes of death are heart disease and stroke.
  • Is diabetes a neurological disorder?

    The salient consequences of hypoglycaemia, found as a complication of treatment with insulin or sulphonylurea drugs, are neurological. Late secondary manifestations are a major problem in diabetes. As they affect the nervous system, the most important are peripheral neuropathy and cerebrovascular disease.
  • What body systems are affected by an asthma attack?

    The examination of the GIT amongst asthmatics has shown various pathological alterations, some of which correlate to that seen in the respiratory system, under similar conditions, and may have arisen due to bronchial asthma using the mucosal immunological system as a means of affecting this region of the body.
B.

How does diabetes affect the human body systems?

Diabetes affects our blood vessels and nerves and therefore can affect any part of the body. However, certain parts of our body are affected more than other parts. Diabetic complications will usually take a number of years of poorly controlled diabetes to develop.
  • What are the complications of diabetes?

    Possible complications include:
    • Cardiovascular disease.
    • Nerve damage (neuropathy).
    • Kidney damage (nephropathy).
    • Eye damage (retinopathy).
    • Foot damage.
    • Skin conditions.
    • Hearing impairment.
    • Alzheimer's disease.
  • How does diabetes affect your heart?

    Over time, high blood glucose from diabetes can damage your blood vessels and the nerves that control your heart and blood vessels. The longer you have diabetes, the higher the chances that you will develop heart disease. In adults with diabetes, the most common causes of death are heart disease and stroke.
  • How the diabetes is diagnosed?

    A fasting blood sugar level from 100 to 125 mg/dL (5.6 to 6.9 mmol/L) is considered prediabetes. If it's 126 mg/dL (7 mmol/L) or higher on two separate tests, you have diabetes. Oral glucose tolerance test. For this test, you fast overnight, and the fasting blood sugar level is measured.
C.

What body system causes diabetes?

Type 1 diabetes occurs when your immune system, the body's system for fighting infection, attacks and destroys the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas. Scientists think type 1 diabetes is caused by genes and environmental factors, such as viruses, that might trigger the disease.
  • Can drinking too much alcohol cause diabetes?

    Moderate alcohol use is defined as one drink a day for women of all ages and men older than age 65, and up to two drinks a day for men age 65 and younger. Too much alcohol may cause chronic inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis), which can impair its ability to secrete insulin and potentially lead to diabetes.
  • What does it feel like when your blood sugar is too high?

    Your blood sugar may be too high if you are very thirsty and tired, have blurry vision, are losing weight fast, and have to go to the bathroom often. Very high blood sugar may make you feel sick to your stomach, faint, or throw up. It can cause you to lose too much fluid from your body.
  • Can you make Type 2 diabetes go away?

    At the time that type 1 diabetes is diagnosed, most patients still are producing some insulin. Patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes may discover that if they are overweight at diagnosis and then lose weight and begin regular physical activity, their blood glucose returns to normal.

Updated: 2nd October 2019

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