What is the average life expectancy after a kidney transplant?

A living donor kidney functions, on average, 12 to 20 years, and a deceased donor kidney from 8 to 12 years. Patients who get a kidney transplant before dialysis live an average of 10 to 15 years longer than if they stayed on dialysis.
A.

Why do we need a kidney?

Your kidneys are vital for your survival. They have several extremely important functions. Their main tasks are to filter waste substances out of your blood and balance the levels of salts and water in your body.
  • How much water should you drink if you only have one kidney?

    In general, special diets are not needed by individuals who have one healthy kidney. You should have a healthy well-balanced diet, reduce your salt intake and aim to drink six to eight glasses of water a day, or a minimum of two liters.
  • What are the reasons for a kidney transplant?

    High blood pressure or hypertension – This is another common cause of kidney disease and failure. High blood pressure in the tiny blood vessels to the kidney leads to damage and prevents the filtering process from working properly. Another condition is called polycystic kidney disease which is an inherited condition.
  • Can I be a kidney donor?

    Living donation is when someone donates one of their organs – usually a kidney - to someone else, whilst they are still alive. Most often living donors are close relatives or friend of the recipient, but you can still donate an organ to someone you do not know. You can also donate part of your liver.
B.

Why do some kidney transplants fail?

Acute rejection can be caused by white blood cells attacking the kidney ('cellular' or 'T cell mediated rejection'), or it may be caused by antibodies against the kidney. Antibody mediated rejection often requires stronger treatment.
  • Can you die from a kidney transplant?

    There are several ways of looking at the risks associated with kidney transplantation. Overall, two to four people out of 100 (2% to 4%) will die in the first year after a kidney transplant. In comparison, the risk of death is twice as high for patients who continue on dialysis while waiting for a kidney transplant.
  • Can the kidneys start working again?

    After several weeks the kidneys may begin to work again and dialysis can be stopped. Sometimes chronic (long-lasting) kidney failure develops, which requires long-term dialysis or a kidney transplant. The kidneys usually start working normally again when the condition causing the kidney failure is treated.
  • How much does it cost to get a kidney transplant?

    According to the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS), the first-year billed charges for a kidney transplant are more than $262,000. Following your transplant, you will need several drugs, called immunosuppresives, to sustain your transplanted kidney and/or pancreas.
C.

What is the success rate of a kidney transplant?

Kidney transplant success rates. According to the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network: Failure of the transplanted kidney is reported in about 4 percent of deceased-donor kidney transplant recipients within one year after transplant and in 21 percent of cases five years after transplant.
  • Can donating a kidney shorten your life?

    Donating a Kidney Doesn't Shorten Donor's Life. However, the findings do show a higher rate of death in the first 90 days after surgery for the live kidney donors compared with the control group. And certain subgroups have a greater mortality risk over the long-term than others.
  • Do they remove the kidney in a kidney transplant?

    A kidney transplant is a surgery done to replace a diseased kidney with a healthy kidney from a donor. The kidney may come from a deceased organ donor or from a living donor. The diseased kidneys are usually left in place. The transplanted kidney is placed in the lower abdomen on the front side of the body.
  • Why do some kidney transplants fail?

    Acute rejection can be caused by white blood cells attacking the kidney ('cellular' or 'T cell mediated rejection'), or it may be caused by antibodies against the kidney. Antibody mediated rejection often requires stronger treatment.

Updated: 14th October 2018

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