7th December 2019

study
13

What is Shakespeare talking about in Sonnet 18?

Thou art more lovely and more temperate: (Shakespeare believes his love is more desirable and has a more even temper than summer.) Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, (Before summer, strong winds knock buds off of the flowering trees.)

In respect to this, what is the theme of the sonnet 18?

The general theme of the sonnet is that what is written about in poetry is eternal - specifically in this poem, Shakespeare is admiring a woman, and saying that her beauty will never fade because he is putting it into verse. He begins by comparing her to a summer day, and then saying she is much more beautiful.

What is the tone and mood of Sonnet 18?

In Shakespeare's Sonnet 18, he is asking a rhetorical question. "Shall I Compare Thee to a Summer's Day" is the question. In this rhetorical question, he proceeds to compare his beloved to a summer's day. His tone is endearing, evoking affection from his beloved and the reader.

What is the form of Sonnet 18?

Structure. Sonnet 18 is a typical English or Shakespearean sonnet. It consists of three quatrains followed by a couplet, and it has the characteristic rhyme scheme: abab cdcd efef gg. The poem reflects the rhetorical tradition of an Italian or Petrarchan Sonnet.
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