What is meant by shockable rhythm?

This refers to whether a particular class of cardiac dysrhythmia is treatable using defibrillation. The two "shockable" rhythms are ventricular fibrillation and pulseless ventricular tachycardia while the two "non–shockable" rhythms are asystole and pulseless electrical activity.
A.

What is a shockable and non shockable rhythm?

The cardiac arrest treatment algorithm divides cardiopulmonary resuscitation into the treatment of shockable rhythms - ventricular fibrillation (VF) and pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VT) (Figure 1); and the treatment of non-shockable rhythms - asystole and pulseless electrical activity (PEA) (Figure 2).
  • What is the most common cause of sudden cardiac death?

    But some types of arrhythmia can be serious and lead to a sudden stop in heart function (sudden cardiac arrest). The most common cause of cardiac arrest is an arrhythmia called ventricular fibrillation — when rapid, erratic electrical impulses cause your ventricles to quiver uselessly instead of pumping blood.
  • What heart rhythms do you defibrillate?

    Description. Defibrillation - is the treatment for immediately life-threatening arrhythmias with which the patient does not have a pulse, ie ventricular fibrillation (VF) or pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VT). Cardioversion - is any process that aims to convert an arrhythmia back to sinus rhythm.
  • Why is asystole not a shockable rhythm?

    Treatment. PEA is treated much like asystole. It is not a shockable rhythm because the electrical system in the heart is actually working properly. Shocking the patient is done to 'reset' the heart's rhythm, but the problem in PEA isn't in the conduction of electrical stimuli in the heart.
B.

What heart rhythms do you defibrillate?

Description. Defibrillation - is the treatment for immediately life-threatening arrhythmias with which the patient does not have a pulse, ie ventricular fibrillation (VF) or pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VT). Cardioversion - is any process that aims to convert an arrhythmia back to sinus rhythm.
  • Which rhythm requires synchronized cardioversion?

    Synchronized electrical cardioversion is used to treat hemodynamically unstable supraventricular (or narrow complex) tachycardias, including atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter. It is also used in the emergent treatment of wide complex tachycardias, including ventricular tachycardia, when a pulse is present.
  • What is non shockable rhythm?

    Treatment of Ventricular Fibrillation (VF) and Pulseless Ventricular Tachycardia (VT) is included in the Cardiac Arrest Algorithm. VF and pulseless VT are shockable rhythms and treated in similar fashion. Asystole and PEA are also included in the cardiac arrest algorithm but are nonshockable rhythms.
  • How many joules do you shock with?

    If the patient is in Ventricular tachycardia (VT) or ventricular fibrillation (VF) on the monitor, immediately apply the pads and shock the patient with 120-200 Joules on a biphasic defibrillator or 360 Joules on a monophasic defibrillator. Continue CPR for 2 minutes while establishing IV or IO access.
C.

Is asystole shockable?

Asystole may be treated with 1 mg epinephrine by IV every 3–5 minutes as needed. Survival rates in a cardiac arrest patient with asystole are much lower than a patient with a rhythm amenable to defibrillation; asystole is itself not a "shockable" rhythm.
  • Is asystole shockable?

    Asystole may be treated with 1 mg epinephrine by IV every 3–5 minutes as needed. Survival rates in a cardiac arrest patient with asystole are much lower than a patient with a rhythm amenable to defibrillation; asystole is itself not a "shockable" rhythm.
  • What is the treatment for asystole?

    The advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) 2010 guidelines allow vasopressin 40 IU IV as a 1-time dose treatment option in VF and asystole. This treatment can be given either before epinephrine or after the first dose of epinephrine.
  • What can cause the heart to stop beating?

    Ventricular fibrillation is the most common cause of cardiac arrest. Ventricular fibrillation occurs when the normal, regular, electrical activation of heart muscle contraction is replaced by chaotic electrical activity that causes the heart to stop beating and pumping blood to the brain and other parts of the body.

Updated: 25th September 2018

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