25th November 2019

mayoclinic
16

What is considered a fever using a temporal thermometer?

Your child has a fever if he or she: Has a rectal, ear or temporal artery temperature of 100.4 F (38 C) or higher. Has an oral temperature of 100 F (37.8 C) or higher. Has an armpit temperature of 99 F (37.2 C) or higher.

Keeping this in view, what is a normal temporal temperature?

The average normal oral temperature is 98.6°F (37°C). An armpit (axillary) temperature is usually 0.5°F (0.3°C) to 1°F (0.6°C) lower than an oral temperature. A forehead (temporal) scanner is usually 0.5°F (0.3°C) to 1°F (0.6°C) lower than an oral temperature.

Do you add a degree to a temporal thermometer?

Rectal temperatures are usually about 1 degree higher than oral temperatures and 1 1/2 degrees higher than axillary temperatures, but since you don't have to add a degree with ear or temporal thermometers, talking about adding or subtracting a degree can be confusing.

Which temperature is considered to be the most accurate?

A fever is considered to be a rectal, ear or temporal artery temperature of 100.4ºF (38ºC) or higher. If you are using an oral or oral pacifier thermometer, many doctors would say that a fever is also over 100.4ºF (38ºC), but some may consider a fever in a young patient, to be an oral temperature of 100ºF or 37.8ºC.
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