What is an antagonistic pair of muscles?

Muscle pairs. Antagonistic pairs of muscles create movement when one (the prime mover) contracts and the other (the antagonist) relaxes. Examples of antagonistic pairs working are: the quadriceps and hamstrings in the leg. the biceps and triceps in the arm.
A.

What is agonist and antagonist training?

He did the same for other opposing body parts, like biceps and triceps. Pressing strength increases dramatically by working the antagonist muscles between sets of benching. Agonist/antagonist training ensures that you're doing enough work for both sides of the body for better muscular balance.
  • What are the opposing muscle groups?

    The Large Opposing Muscle Groups
    • Upper Arm (movement of the elbow): The Upper Arm: The Biceps and the Triceps.
    • Shoulder and Upper Back: Deltoids and Latissimus Dorsi.
    • Upper Chest and Upper Back: Pectoralis Major and Trapezius/Rhomboids.
    • Stomach and Lower Back: Abdominals and Erector Spinae.
  • What is the agonist muscle?

    Agonist: The agonist in a movement is the muscle(s) that provides the major force to complete the movement. Because of this agonists are known as the 'prime movers'. In the bicep curl which produces flexion at the elbow, the biceps muscle is the agonist, as seen in the image below.
  • Which defines an antagonist muscle?

    1. antagonistic muscle - (physiology) a muscle that opposes the action of another; "the biceps and triceps are antagonistic muscles" muscle, musculus - one of the contractile organs of the body. agonist - a muscle that contracts while another relaxes; "when bending the elbow the biceps are the agonist"
B.

What is a alternating set?

There are two techniques called Alternating Sets and Circuits. The difference between them is that Alternating Sets are about two exercises and Circuits are about more than two. The main principle is the same. You take two or more exercises and alternate between sets of them.
  • What is a compound set?

    Note: A compound set is accomplished by doing two different exercises back to back, with no rest in-between, for the same muscle group. A compound set should not be confused with a Superset, which in contrast, is doing two different exercises back to back for opposing muscle groups.
  • What is a superset when working out?

    At its very core, a superset is simple: alternating sets of two different exercises with no rest in between. For example, doing a set of biceps curls and a set of triceps dips, alternating until you've completed all the sets. With an intelligently designed superset, you can have a goal in mind."
  • What are supersets and Dropsets?

    A drop set is basically an extended set of a move, usually performed as the last set of that exercise as a burnout. A superset is a combination of two or three moves that either work the same bodypart or opposing muscle groups, and the exercises are done back to back with no rest in between.
C.

What is the opposing muscle of the gluteus maximus?

The opposing muscle group for the hip flexors are the hip extensors. The hip flexors are made up of the gluteus maximus and the hamstrings. They perform the opposite movement to the hip flexors. If you kick someone in the shins who is standing behind you then the movement at the hip would be hip extension.
  • What are the complementary muscles?

    Your weight training routine can be tailored to train opposite muscle groups, such as biceps and triceps together, back and chest together. Alternatively, you can train complementary muscle groups together, such as back and biceps in one workout, chest and triceps in another.
  • What does it mean when muscles work in antagonistic pairs?

    Antagonistic pairs of muscles create movement when one (the prime mover) contracts and the other (the antagonist) relaxes. Examples of antagonistic pairs working are: the quadriceps and hamstrings in the leg. the biceps and triceps in the arm.
  • Is tongue the strongest muscle in human body?

    By that measure, the hardest working muscle in your body is the one that's pump-pump-pumping 24/7 to keep your blood flowing round and round, including to all the other muscles: your heart. The tongue may not be as strong as the glutes, jaw or heart but strengthening it may still be useful.

Updated: 6th October 2019

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