2nd October 2019

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What is a shockable and non shockable rhythm?

The cardiac arrest treatment algorithm divides cardiopulmonary resuscitation into the treatment of shockable rhythms - ventricular fibrillation (VF) and pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VT) (Figure 1); and the treatment of non-shockable rhythms - asystole and pulseless electrical activity (PEA) (Figure 2).

Moreover, what is meant by shockable rhythm?

This refers to whether a particular class of cardiac dysrhythmia is treatable using defibrillation. The two "shockable" rhythms are ventricular fibrillation and pulseless ventricular tachycardia while the two "non–shockable" rhythms are asystole and pulseless electrical activity.

What heart rhythms do you defibrillate?

Description. Defibrillation - is the treatment for immediately life-threatening arrhythmias with which the patient does not have a pulse, ie ventricular fibrillation (VF) or pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VT). Cardioversion - is any process that aims to convert an arrhythmia back to sinus rhythm.

Is asystole shockable?

Asystole may be treated with 1 mg epinephrine by IV every 3–5 minutes as needed. Survival rates in a cardiac arrest patient with asystole are much lower than a patient with a rhythm amenable to defibrillation; asystole is itself not a "shockable" rhythm.
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