What is a ligand that can cross the cell membrane?

A receptor detects a signal molecule and carries out an action in response. A ligand is a molecule that acts as a signal when it binds to a receptor. A ligand that can cross the cell membrane can bind to an intracellular receptor. The cell membrane allows some, but not all, molecules to cross.
A.

What does the cell membrane allow to pass through it?

The most important property of the cell membrane is its selective permeability: some substances can pass through it freely, but others cannot. Small and nonpolar (hydrophobic) molecules can freely pass through the membrane, but charged ions and large molecules such as proteins and sugars are barred passage.
  • What substances go in and out of the cell membrane?

    Water, carbon dioxide, and oxygen are among the few simple molecules that can cross the cell membrane by diffusion (or a type of diffusion known as osmosis ). Diffusion is one principle method of movement of substances within cells, as well as the method for essential small molecules to cross the cell membrane.
  • What is a phospholipid and where is it found?

    Phospholipids are a class of lipids that are a major component of all cell membranes. They can form lipid bilayers because of their amphiphilic characteristic. The structure of the phospholipid molecule generally consists of two hydrophobic fatty acid "tails" and a hydrophilic "head" consisting of a phosphate group.
  • Can polar molecules cross the cell membrane?

    The plasma membrane is selectively permeable; hydrophobic molecules and small polar molecules can diffuse through the lipid layer, but ions and large polar molecules cannot. Integral membrane proteins enable ions and large polar molecules to pass through the membrane by passive or active transport.
B.

What is a ligand in cell signaling?

Receptor Proteins Exhibit Ligand-Binding and Effector Specificity. As noted earlier, the cellular response to a particular extracellular signaling molecule depends on its binding to a specific receptor protein located on the surface of a target cell or in its nucleus or cytosol.
  • What does a ligand do?

    In biochemistry and pharmacology, a ligand is a substance that forms a complex with a biomolecule to serve a biological purpose. In protein-ligand binding, the ligand is usually a molecule which produces a signal by binding to a site on a target protein.
  • Is acetylcholine a ligand?

    The prototypic ligand-gated ion channel is the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. It consists of a pentamer of protein subunits (typically ααβγδ), with two binding sites for acetylcholine (one at the interface of each alpha subunit).
  • What is cell signal?

    Cell signaling (cell signalling in British English) is part of any communication process that governs basic activities of cells and coordinates all cell actions. Errors in signaling interactions and cellular information processing are responsible for diseases such as cancer, autoimmunity, and diabetes.
C.

What is a ligand in cell biology?

In biochemistry and pharmacology, a ligand is a substance that forms a complex with a biomolecule to serve a biological purpose. In protein-ligand binding, the ligand is usually a molecule which produces a signal by binding to a site on a target protein.
  • Is dopamine a ligand?

    Dopamine receptors are a class of G protein-coupled receptors that are prominent in the vertebrate central nervous system (CNS). The neurotransmitter dopamine is the primary endogenous ligand for dopamine receptors.
  • What is the G protein?

    G proteins, also known as guanine nucleotide-binding proteins, are a family of proteins that act as molecular switches inside cells, and are involved in transmitting signals from a variety of stimuli outside a cell to its interior.
  • What is a low affinity?

    Affinity is a measure of the strength of attraction between a receptor and its ligand. High-affinity binding results from stronger intermolecular forces between a receptor and its ligand, leading to a a longer residence time at the binding site (higher "on" rate, lower "off" rate).

Updated: 25th November 2019

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