What does Pneumovax 23 Treat?

Pneumovax 23 (Pneumococcal Vaccine Polyvalent) is a vaccine that helps protect against serious infection, such as ear infection, sinus infection, pneumonia, blood infection (bacteremia), and meningitis (infection of the covering of the brain) due to the bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae.
A.

What is the difference between Prevnar 13 and Prevnar 23?

The main difference between the two is the amount of bacteria that the vaccine can help protect against. Pneumovax 23 protects against 23 types of pneumococcal bacteria, while Prevnar 13 protects against 13 types of pneumococcal bacteria.
  • How long do you need to wait for Prevnar after Pneumovax?

    If you have previously received two doses of Pneumovax 23, ACIP recommends: a dose of Prevnar 13 after at least one year has passed. a third dose of Pneumovax 23 after at least five years have passed since your previous dose of Pneumovax 23 and eight weeks since your Prevnar 13 dose.
  • When can you give Pneumovax after Prevnar?

    Wait until at least one year has passed since any previous Pneumovax 23 dose to give Prevnar 13. A second Pneumovax 23 should be given at least five years after the first, but at least eight weeks after Prevnar 13.
  • When did Prevnar 13 become available for adults?

    On August 13, 2014, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommended routine use of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13 [Prevnar 13, Wyeth Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a subsidiary of Pfizer Inc.]) among adults aged ≥65 years.
B.

Is pneumococcal vaccine live or inactivated?

These 23 types cause about 9 out of every 10 infections caused by pneumococcus bacteria. The vaccine is inactivated, which means that it does not contain any live pneumococcal bacteria. It cannot cause pneumococcal disease. In the UK, PPV is given to adults aged 65 and over.
  • Which is an example of a vaccine that is a killed virus vaccine?

    2. Killed-inactivated vaccines. To produce this type of vaccines, bacteria or viruses are killed or inactivated by a chemical treatment or heat. This group includes for example the inactivated poliovirus (IPV) vaccine, pertussis vaccine, rabies vaccine, or hepatitis A virus vaccine.
  • Can you get pneumonia after getting the shot?

    Although the pneumonia vaccine can't prevent all cases, it can lower your chances of catching the disease. And if you've had the shot and you do get pneumonia anyway, you will probably have a much milder case.
  • What is the difference between Prevnar 13 and 23?

    The main difference between the two is the amount of bacteria that the vaccine can help protect against. Pneumovax 23 protects against 23 types of pneumococcal bacteria, while Prevnar 13 protects against 13 types of pneumococcal bacteria.
C.

What is pneumococcal vaccine 23?

PNEUMOVAX®23 (Pneumococcal Vaccine Polyvalent) is a vaccine indicated for active immunization for the prevention of pneumococcal disease caused by the 23 serotypes contained in the vaccine (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6B, 7F, 8, 9N, 9V, 10A, 11A, 12F, 14, 15B, 17F, 18C, 19F, 19A, 20, 22F, 23F, and 33F).
  • What is a 23 valent pneumococcal vaccine?

    Pneumococcal bacteria can infect the sinuses and inner ear. It can also infect the lungs, blood, and brain and these conditions can be fatal. Pneumococcal polysaccharides vaccine (PPSV) is used to prevent infection caused by pneumococcal bacteria. PPSV contains 23 of the most common types of pneumococcal bacteria.
  • Which are the live vaccines?

    Live virus vaccines use the weakened (attenuated) form of the virus. The measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine and the varicella (chickenpox) vaccine are examples. Killed (inactivated) vaccines are made from a protein or other small pieces taken from a virus or bacteria.
  • How many different types of pneumonia are there?

    Key points about pneumonia. Pneumonia is an infection of one or both of the lungs caused by bacteria, viruses, or fungi. There are more than 30 different causes of pneumonia, and they're grouped by the cause. The main types of pneumonia are bacterial, viral, and mycoplasma pneumonia.

Updated: 2nd November 2019

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