What antidepressants can be used for hot flashes?

A study has found that the antidepressant Effexor (chemical name: venlafaxine) eased hot flashes just as well as hormone replacement therapy (HRT). There are two types of antidepressant medicines: SSRIs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors) and SNRIs (serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors).
A.

What is the best medication for hot flashes?

Gabapentin and pregabalin, usually given for nerve-mediated pain or seizures, offer relief for some women. Antidepressants venlafaxine (Effexor), fluoxetine (Prozac), and paroxetine (Paxil) have also been shown to be effective for treatment of hot flashes.
  • What age do you stop having hot flashes?

    Menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes may last for years after menopause begins. But there are treatments that can offer relief. Q. I'm 62 years old, and my last menstrual period was at age 51. My doctor told me that my hot flashes would end after "about three to five years," but I still have them.
  • How long does it take for menopause to end?

    Duration. Perimenopausal symptoms can last four years on average. The symptoms associated with this phase will gradually ease during menopause and postmenopause. Women who've gone an entire year without a period are considered postmenopausal.
  • What can you do for hot flashes?

    Each woman's triggers for hot flashes may be a little different, but some common ones include:
    • drinking alcohol.
    • consuming products with caffeine.
    • eating spicy foods.
    • being in a hot room.
    • feeling stressed or anxious.
    • wearing tight clothing.
    • smoking or being exposed to cigarette smoke.
    • bending over.
B.

What is the natural remedy for hot flashes?

Natural Remedies for Hot Flashes
  • Black Cohosh. (Actaea racemosa, Cimicifuga racemosa) This herb has received quite a bit of scientific attention for its possible effects on hot flashes.
  • Red Clover.
  • Dong Quai.
  • Ginseng.
  • Kava.
  • Evening Primrose Oil.
  • Use with Caution.
  • What does estroven help with?

    Estroven® Weight Management goes beyond relieving hot flashes and night sweats to safely help manage weight during menopause.* During menopause your serotonin levels naturally decline which can result in feelings of hunger, a less efficient metabolism, and moodiness. Helps with: Hot Flashes*
  • What age do you stop having hot flashes?

    Menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes may last for years after menopause begins. But there are treatments that can offer relief. Q. I'm 62 years old, and my last menstrual period was at age 51. My doctor told me that my hot flashes would end after "about three to five years," but I still have them.
  • What are the health benefits of black cohosh?

    Black cohosh is also known as Cimicifuga racemosa, baneberry, bugbane, black snake root, rattleroot, bugwort, and richweed. Black cohosh has been used in alternative medicine as an aid in treating the symptoms of menopause and menstrual discomfort.
C.

Can antidepressants help with menopausal symptoms?

Antidepressant may have Role in Treating Menopause Symptoms. When menopausal women cannot or do not want to take estrogen to combat bothersome hot flashes and night sweats, antidepressants may serve as an effective alternative.
  • Can HRT help with depression?

    Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is a treatment currently used to relieve symptoms of menopause such as night sweats and hot flashes. HRT can also help prevent bone-thinning osteoporosis. However, the true contribution of hormones to depression is not known.
  • How long will I have hot flashes?

    According to conventional medical wisdom, menopause-related hot flashes fade away after six to 24 months. Not so, says a new study of women going through menopause. Hot flashes and night sweats last, on average, for about seven years and may go on for 11 years or more.
  • What are the symptoms of post menopause?

    You may be transitioning into menopause if you begin experiencing some or all of the following symptoms:
    • Hot flashes (a sudden feeling of warmth that spreads over the body)
    • Night sweats and/or cold flashes.
    • Vaginal dryness; discomfort during sex.
    • Urinary urgency (a pressing need to urinate more frequently)

Updated: 16th October 2019

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