Is it OK to eat eggplant that is brown inside?

Q. Eggplant: sometimes the white pulp inside the eggplants has darker spots. A. Eggplant flesh will have tan to brown colored spots around the seeds. If this is the color you are referring to, it is edible. If the flesh is more brown than white, the eggplant may be spoiling and should be discarded.
A.

How can you tell if an eggplant is ripe?

Hold the eggplant in the palm of your hand and gently squeeze it with your fingertips. The skin should be slightly elastic and spring back when you release it. If indentations remain where your fingertips were, the eggplant isn't ripe yet. Look for soft spots or bruises on the skin of the eggplant.
  • When eggplant is ready to pick?

    Skin should be glossy and thin. Eggplant harvest may begin when the fruits are developed and small, but growing fruits to full size before harvesting eggplants results in more fruit for usage. Harvesting eggplants should occur when the inner flesh is cream colored, fruits are firm and before seeds are visible.
  • How do you know if an eggplant is ripe?

    Hold the eggplant in the palm of your hand and gently squeeze it with your fingertips. The skin should be slightly elastic and spring back when you release it. If indentations remain where your fingertips were, the eggplant isn't ripe yet. Look for soft spots or bruises on the skin of the eggplant.
  • How do you saute eggplant?

    Heat oil in large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add eggplant; cook 10 minutes or until tender, stirring occasionally. Add undrained tomatoes, salt and pepper to skillet; cook 2 minutes or until hot. Sprinkle with cheese and serve.
B.

How can you tell a good eggplant?

Look for: eggplants with smooth, shiny skin that are uniform in color and heavy for their size. To test for ripeness, lightly press a finger against the skin. If it leaves an imprint, the eggplant is ripe. Choose smaller eggplants as they tend to be sweeter, less bitter, have thinner skin and less seeds.
  • Do you have to refrigerate tomatoes?

    Great, you might be thinking. You just showed that tomatoes rot faster at room temperature than in the refrigerator. Big whoop But the point is this: if you're buying your tomatoes ripe (which you should be!) and not eating them immediately, you're better off storing them in the fridge than on the countertop.
  • Do you put cucumbers in the fridge?

    Wrap the cucumber in plastic wrap. Keeping the cucumber wrapped minimizes the amount of moisture on the cucumber, which slows the process of decay. After wrapping, put the cucumber in the refrigerator. This should keep it cold enough to stay fresh for one week to 10 days.
  • What is the best way to store carrots?

    Once the greens are trimmed off, all you have to do to keep the carrots crisp and fresh is put them in a container of water and store in the refrigerator! Whole carrots stay nice and crunchy in their cold water bath, and this is also a great way to store packaged baby carrots.
C.

Are eggplant supposed to be soft?

A Little Firmness Is A-Okay. "Eggplant should be slightly firm but not hard," says Leone. In other words, if you push on it with your finger and the veggie feels very soft, or you're able to puncture the skin, it's too far gone. A perfectly ripe eggplant will not have as much give when touched as a ripe tomato or peach
  • Is it okay to eat raw eggplant?

    Vegetables in the nightshade family contain anywhere from 2 to 13mg of solanine and eggplants contain 11mg at the most. So you would have to eat 36 raw eggplants to cause any harm. Therefore, there's no need to be concerned about eating reasonable amounts of raw eggplant. You should, however, be wary of green potatoes.
  • When eggplant is in season?

    SEASON: Although available year-round, eggplant is at its peak from July to October. CHOOSING: When selecting, look for eggplants with firm, glossy skin. Size and color vary widely among types, but the eggplant should feel heavy.
  • Why is it called an eggplant?

    There is actually a color — aubergine — that resembles the purple of the eggplant. Apparently, way back in the 1700s, early European versions of eggplant were smaller and yellow or white. They looked a bit like goose or hen's eggs, which led to the name “eggplant."

Updated: 30th September 2018

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