26th October 2019

wikipedia
14

Is covalent and molecular bonds the same thing?

A covalent bond, also called a molecular bond, is a chemical bond that involves the sharing of electron pairs between atoms. Thus, covalent bonding does not necessarily require that the two atoms be of the same elements, only that they be of comparable electronegativity.

In this regard, what is the difference between a molecular and a covalent network solid?

Molecular solids—Made up of atoms or molecules held together by London dispersion forces, dipole-dipole forces, or hydrogen bonds. An example of a molecular solid is sucrose. Covalent-network (also called atomic) solids—Made up of atoms connected by covalent bonds; the intermolecular forces are covalent bonds as well.

What is the difference between a molecular and a covalent solid?

Molecular solids—Made up of atoms or molecules held together by London dispersion forces, dipole-dipole forces, or hydrogen bonds. Covalent-network (also called atomic) solids—Made up of atoms connected by covalent bonds; the intermolecular forces are covalent bonds as well.

What is covalent network and molecular?

A network solid or covalent network solid is a chemical compound (or element) in which the atoms are bonded by covalent bonds in a continuous network extending throughout the material. In a network solid there are no individual molecules, and the entire crystal or amorphous solid may be considered a macromolecule.
Write Your Answer

Rate

86% people found this answer useful, click to cast your vote.

4.3 / 5 based on 3 votes.

Bookmark

Press Ctrl + D to add this site to your favorites!

Share