Can you be cured of multiple sclerosis?

MS is curable. The facts: Unfortunately, there is no cure for MS yet. That said, long-term remission is possible for many people. Some may never experience any further symptoms after they are diagnosed with MS, but evidence of progression can still pop up on new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of the brain.
A.

What is the life expectancy of a person with MS?

MS itself is rarely fatal, but complications may arise from severe MS, such as chest or bladder infections, or swallowing difficulties. The average life expectancy for people with MS is around 5 to 10 years lower than average, and this gap appears to be getting smaller all the time.
  • Can you drive if you have multiple sclerosis?

    In the same way that other things we do can be affected by MS, the ability to drive can also be altered. Although symptoms associated with MS can affect the skills necessary for safe driving, adaptive automobile equipment is available to help you keep driving safely.
  • Is MS a terminal disease?

    No, it isn't classed as a terminal illness. It is a life long condition because there is no cure so far. It is a condition where treatments exist but where much better treatments are needed. It's not an easy job to explain MS – it is a complex condition and it is a variable condition but it is not a terminal condition.
  • Do multiple sclerosis lesions go away?

    Answer: First, yes, lesions can disappear from the MRI in MS, and it happens all the time. I describe how it occurs in the first Health Page, "How MRIs Show Lesions in MS." In brief, a lesion (a T2 hyperintense white matter lesion) first demyelinates and shows up on the MRI for as long as it is in the damaged state.
B.

What is the average life expectancy of someone with multiple sclerosis?

Average life span of 25 to 35 years after the diagnosis of MS is made are often stated. Some of the most common causes of death in MS patients are secondary complications resulting from immobility, chronic urinary tract infections, compromised swallowing and breathing.
  • Is ALS fatal?

    It's the weakness or failure of the breathing muscles that makes ALS fatal. And that's the particularly devastating part of the disease; unlike cancer, with its rare but real remissions, ALS is always fatal. Patients might choose to have a ventilator artificially breathe for them.
  • Can MS go away on its own?

    For Americans living with multiple sclerosis (MS), the majority are initially diagnosed with relapsing-remitting MS, or when the symptoms ebb and flow. While a relapse that causes serious symptoms usually needs to be treated, old symptoms that reappear are not as serious and often go away without needing treatment.
  • Is MS a painful disease?

    Everyone experiences pain differently. There are two main types of pain in multiple sclerosis: nerve pain (neuropathic pain) which is caused by damage to the nerves in the brain and spinal cord. This includes altered sensations such as pins and needles, numbness, crawling or burning feelings.
C.

Can MS go away on its own?

For Americans living with multiple sclerosis (MS), the majority are initially diagnosed with relapsing-remitting MS, or when the symptoms ebb and flow. While a relapse that causes serious symptoms usually needs to be treated, old symptoms that reappear are not as serious and often go away without needing treatment.
  • What is an MS flare up like?

    An exacerbation of MS (also known as a relapse, attack or flare-up) causes new symptoms or the worsening of old symptoms. For example, the exacerbation might be an episode of optic neuritis (caused by inflammation of the optic nerve that impairs vision), or problems with balance or severe fatigue.
  • What can cause multiple sclerosis?

    The cause of multiple sclerosis is unknown. It's considered an autoimmune disease in which the body's immune system attacks its own tissues. In the case of MS, this immune system malfunction destroys myelin (the fatty substance that coats and protects nerve fibers in the brain and spinal cord).
  • Can heat cause MS relapse?

    Your symptoms may not be a true relapse. Pseudo-relapses may be caused by exposure to heat or infection. Symptoms caused by heat sensitivity are known as Uhthoff's phenomenon. Nerve damage from MS can make you very sensitive to even small rises in body temperature, such as from sunbathing, a hot bath, or a fever.

Updated: 22nd October 2018

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